COOPER BROADSHEET: October 2014

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SPECIAL EVENTS ISSUE!

We have a bunch of great events coming up.  Here’s the overview, with details below.  All events sponsored by the Cooper Honors Program in English are FREE and OPEN TO THE PUBLIC.

Oct. 20: MFA Application Introduction: Derrick Austen, Rob Bruno, Suzi Garcia: 3:30pm SH 205

Oct. 23: Student conference in affiliation with the Arkansas Philological Association Conference.

Oct. 23-25: Arkansas Philological Association Conference

Oct. 29: Jeff Cowton (Dove Cottage / Wordsworth Trust): 6:30pm, DSC-G

Nov. 3: Jean-Robert Cadet: 6:30pm, Stella Boyle Smith Auditorium

Nov. 13: Sam Shepard’s Fool for Love: Special Performance by the Precipice Theater. 

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Oct. 20: MFA Application Introduction: Derrick Austen, Rob Bruno, Suzi Garcia: 3:30pm SH 205.  Contact Prof. Nickole Brown (lnbrown@ualr.edu).

MFA

Oct. 23: Student conference in affiliation with the Arkansas Philological Association Conference.

Oct. 23-25: Arkansas Philological Association Conference

Hosted by the University of Arkansas at Little Rock, The UALR Department of English & The Linguistics and Language Arts Working Group

To be held at the Arkansas Studies Institute,
A Department of the Central Arkansas Library System,
& the Little Rock Convention Cente

For more information, contact Dr. Jeremy Ecke (jsecke@ualr.edu).

Oct. 29: Jeff Cowton (Wordsworth Foundation): 6:30pm, reception at 6:00pm, DSC-G.  Contact Dr. Paul Yoder (rpyoder@ualr.edu).

Cowton

 Nov. 3:  Jean-Robert Cadet: 6:30pm, Stella Boyle Smith Auditorium.  Contact Dr. Laura Barrio-Vilar (lxbarriovil@ualr.edu).

Cadet1

Cadet2

Nov. 13: Sam Shepard’s Fool for Love: Special Performance by the Precipice Theater.  Performance, followed up with an extensive Q&A.  Also, two master classes: one in developing performances for high school students and one about writing successful dialogue in screenwriting.  Specific details TBA.

Along with coaching new talent, Precipice Theatre features veteran actors from Central Arkansas as well as actors from both coasts. Many of the cast members have been formally educated through entities and institutions such as the American Academy of Dramatic Arts, Stanford, Pepperdine University, Princeton, The Howard Fine Studio, The National Theatre in London and The University of Edinburgh. Precipice Theater is produced by Heather Smith and Ricco Ardemagni. Join the group online at facebook.com/lrprecipice. Those interested in learning more are encouraged to email (lrprecipicetheatre@gmail.com).

For more information, contact Dr. Brad Minnick (jbminnick@ualr.edu).

 

As usual, if you have problems with the page, or you see errors, please contact Doc Yoder at rpyoder@ualr.edu.

COOPER BROADSHEET: September 2014

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WELCOME BACK!

Hi folks!  Welcome back to campus for the 2014-2015 academic year.  We have lots of exciting things coming up, so let’s get to the news.

NEW STIPEND RECIPIENTS

We want to congratulate this year’s stipend recipients:

Returning  recipients are Olivia Barry, Scott Bollen, Rebecca Chism, Logan Ellis, Lizzie Ferguson, Heather Haile, Hunter Parham, Callie Smith, Ali Webb, and Nicole Wilkinson.

First year stipend recipients are Savannah Adams, Geoffrey Bara, Chloe Dillport, Kourtney Mason, Brianna Nicholas, Kelly Singer, and Matt Wilson.

Cooper Honors stipends are $1300 per semester for up to 4 semester.  The stipends are awarded on a competitive basis.  You can apply for a stipend twice during either semester of the regular school year; application deadlines are Consultation Day of the semester.  Information on how to apply is available online here, and click on “Student Application.”  For more information about the program, contact Doc Yoder at rpyoder@ualr.edu.

COOPER COURSES

For Fall 2014, Dr. Kris McAbee is teaching a Cooper seminar on Revenge.  Here’s what she says about it:  This course will interrogate the nature of revenge as a thematic device. We will ask, “What are the elements of revenge? What differentiates revenge from justice? What do we learn from revengers and their quests?” Beginning with Greek tragedies, we will then work through a survey of revenge-oriented texts from the sixteenth century to the present day, representing a range of genres including drama, broadsides ballads, opera, prose fiction, and film. Among selections developed by the class, texts will include Euripides’s Medea, Seneca’s Thyestes, Kyd’s The Spanish Tragedy, Ford’s ‘Tis a Pity She’s a Whore, Mozart’s Don Giovanni, and Park Chan-Wook’s 2003 film, Old Boy.

In Spring 2015, Dr. Jim Levernier will offer a Cooper seminar on The American Dream. More information coming soon!

COOPER LECTURE SERIES (AND RELATED EVENTS)

We have a very exciting line up for the Cooper Lecture Series this year.  As usual, all Cooper Lectures are FREE and OPEN TO THE PUBLIC.

The Arkansas Philological Association Conference will be held on Oct. 23-25 at the Arkansas Studies Institute and the Little Convention Center.  This year the conference is being hosted by UALR, the UALR English Department, and the Linguistics and Language Arts Working Group.  There will also be a day of student sessions on Oct. 22.  The Call for Papers for the APA is here; the Call for Papers for the Students Sessions is here.  To propose a paper, or for more information, please contact Dr. Jeremy Ecke at APAconference@outlook.com.  To propose a paper for the student conference, or for more info please contact Hunter Parham (hrparham@ualr.edu) or Kelly Singer (kesinger@ualr.edu).

Wednesday, Oct. 29: Jeff Cowton, Curator at the Wordsworth Trust at Dove Cottage in Grasmere, England will discuss study opportunities with the Wordsworth Archive at Dove Cottage, where Wordsworth lived with his family for several years.  The presentation will be at 6:30pm in DSC-G.  There will be a reception with hors devours starting at 6:00.

Monday, Nov. 3: Cadet Jean-Robert Cadet will present a lecture at 6:30pm in the Stella Boyle Smith Auditorium.  Cadet’s lecture will concern his experience as a restavek (“child slave”) in Haiti and his current work as an abolitionist.  His visit to campus is in support of both Dr. Kris McAbee’s Cooper seminar on Revenge, and Dr. Laura Barrio-Vilar’s course on Slave Narratives.   Cadet’s own books — Restavec and My Stone of Hope — will be available for purchase at the end of the event. You can check Cadet’s ongoing work on his organization’s webpage.

In mid-March, Dr. James Levernier hopes to bring Dr. Scott Laderman to campus in support of his Cooper seminar on The American Dream.  Dr. Laderman is an Associate Professor of English at the University of Minnesota – Duluth.  He is the author of Tours of Vietnam: War, Travel Guides, and Memory (Duke UP, 2009), and Empire in Waves: A Political History of Surfing (forthcoming from University of California Press).  You can check out his webpage here.  Look for details as they develop.

Undaunted by delay, the Martha Redbone Roots Project will visit UALR for a two-day residency on April 1-2, 2015.  April 1 will feature a private performance and discussion with English Department students and others about her adaptations of William Blake’s poetry.  On April 2, Redbone will visit classes, and her Roots Project trio will present a free, full 2-hour concert in the Stella Boyle Smith Auditorium.  Look for details as the event gets closer, but for a taste of what to expect, check out this.  For more information, contact Doc Yoder at rpyoder@ualr.edu.

STUDENT SUCCESS

 Ashley (Scott) Gershong (grad. 2009) has taken a post-doctoral job as a Lyme disease researcher at the University of Connecticut Health Center.  She will be defending her dissertation (consisting of her four graduate publications) on Nov. 6 .

Melissa Ruth Carrion (grad. 2010) has landed a job as an English Language Center Specialist at Miami University in Middletown, OH.  Here’s what she says, “It was all of my McNair, Cooper and  Donaghey Scholars work that got me the job — my job is to support students, and I know all about what kind of difference a little support can make in a student’s path.”

Nathan Riggs (grad. 2011) has received a Teaching Assistantship at UA-Fayetteville to support his graduate work in English there.

David Measel (grad. 2011) has received his MA in Rhetoric from the UALR Department of Rhetoric and Writing.

As always, if you see any problems or errors, or if you have news, please contact Doc Yoder at rpyoder@ualr.edu.

 

Cooper Broadsheet: March 2014

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Greetings from the Director!  Here’s the news:

MARTHA REDBONE ROOTS PROJECT RESCHEDULED

The Martha Redbone Roots Project 2 day residency has been postponed until the Fall.  The new dates are October 9-10, 2014.  That is the Thursday and Friday before Fall Break, so you can start your break with a bang — a FREE concert by a great R&B / folk trio with a healthy interest in William Blake.  The show will still be in Stella Boyle Smith Auditorium, and Martha Redbone will still visit with several classes.  Look for more details and reminders in the Fall.  For more information contact Doc Yoder at rpyoder@ualr.edu.

SHAKESPEARE SCENE FESTIVAL

The  Shakespeare Scene Festival will be held on March 13-14, 2014.  Here’s what Dr. McAbee posted for wide circulation: The annual Shakespeare Scene Festival will be held in UALR’s University Theater (in the Center for Performing Arts) on Thursday March 13 and Friday March 14, 9:30am-12:30pm both days. Join the audience and encourage others to drop by as schedules permit.

The Shakespeare Scene Festival brings students from central Arkansas schools to campus to celebrate learning through the performance of Shakespeare. The festival is sponsored by the UALR Departments of English and Theater & Dance. It was founded by Roslyn Knutson in 1998 and inspired by a workshop at the Folger Shakespeare Library.

This year will feature 15 different performances and the players will range from 5th graders to high school seniors. We’re expecting around 600 students over the two days of the festival, so come join the fun!

To see a schedule of performances and to find out more about the festival, please visit ualr.edu/shakespeare. Questions should be directed to the festival’s director, Dr. Kris McAbee, at kxmcabee@ualr.edu.

The Shakespeare Scene Festival is FREE and OPEN to the public.

NEW COOPER SUCCESS AWARDS

The Cooper Honors Program is pleased to announce the creation of the Cooper Success Awards.  These two awards are $2500 each for the coming academic year and are open to all English majors.

The Cooper Success Award is granted to a full or part-time student who is currently taking at least six hours and who has a declared major in English. To be eligible, applicants must have at least a 3.0 grade point average in English. Financial need and potential for academic success will be strongly considered. If all other things are equal, financial need will be the deciding factor.

Applicants should submit a typed essay of no more than 600 words discussing your personal and academic goals and explaining how the Cooper Success Award will help you achieve those goals. Applicants should also specifically address the issue of financial need.  For financial need to be considered, a completed FAFSA (Free Application for Federal Student Aid at http://www.fafsa.edu.gov) is required. Award application forms are available in the English Department, Stabler Hall 501, and all materials should be submitted by Monday, March 31, 2014 to the Department of English, Stabler Hall 501.

SPRING COLLOQUIUM: DATE AND VENUE CHANGE

The Spring Cooper Colloquium will be held 11:00am to 2:00pm on Thursday, May 8 in DSC Meeting Room C.  This is a break from past years when the colloquium was held on Friday.  The Cooper Picnic will still be on Friday, May 9 at Murray Park, catering provided by Homer’s.  Both events are FREE and OPEN to English students, their friends, and family.

At this year’s colloquium we expect to have 8 students discussing their Cooper Projects.  Come out, have lunch, and celebrate the great work being done by our Cooper Honors graduates.  This year’s presenters include Nikki Ackerman, Delilah De Vary Ashcraft, Caitlin Love, Matt Quin, Zach Roberson, Lucas Rudd, Brandi Schroeder, and Breana Steele.

UPCOMING COOPER SEMINAR

In Fall 2014, Prof. Kris McAbee will offer a Cooper seminar on “Revenge.”  Here’s what she says about it:  This course will interrogate the nature of revenge as a thematic device. We will ask, “What are the elements of revenge? What differentiates revenge from justice? What do we learn from revengers and their quests?” Beginning with Greek tragedies, we will then work through a survey of revenge-oriented texts from the sixteenth century to the present day, representing a range of genres including drama, broadsides ballads, opera, prose fiction, and film. Among selections developed by the class, texts will include: Euripides’s Medea, Seneca’s Thyestes, Kyd’s The Spanish Tragedy, Ford’s ‘Tis a Pity She’s a Whore, Mozart’s Don Giovanni, Dumas’s Count of Monte Cristo, and Park Chan-Wook’s 2003 film, Old Boy.  For more information contact Dr. McAbee at kxmcabee@ualr.edu.

As always, if you have any problems with the page, see any errors, or have any news, please contact Doc Yoder at rpyoder@ualr.edu.

Cooper Broadsheet: February 2014

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A SOMEWHAT BELATED WELCOME BACK

We are into the 4th week of classes, so I know I’m late in welcoming everyone back for the  Spring Semester.  With the university restructuring, the revision of the core curriculum, and some new Cooper policies, we have been pretty busy.  So, on with it:

NEW STIPEND APPLICATION OPPORTUNITY

In the Fall semester the Cooper Program began to offer a new opportunity for students to apply for Cooper stipends.  In the past the Cooper Program accepted applications for stipends only at the end of Spring semester.  In Fall 2013 we began to accept stipend applications at the end of fall semester as well.  The Cooper Program is happy to announce that Rebecca Chism, Lizzie Ferguson, and Scott Bollen have joined the ranks of Cooper stipend holders.  Cooper stipends are $1300 per semester, renewable for a total of 4 semesters.  Stipends are awarded on a competitive basis, and applications are due on Consultation Day of Fall or Spring semester.  You can check out the Cooper Program website, with instructions on how to apply here.  You can also contact Doc Yoder for more information at rpyoder@ualr.edu

COOPER LECTURE SERIES

Dr. Martin McQuillan of Kingston University in London, England will host a pre-release screening of his new film P.S. in Dickinson Auditorium on Monday, Feb. 24, 2014 at 6:00pm, with a reception at 5:30pm P.S. (2013) is based on Jacques Derrida’s The Post Card.  A blend of scripted live action, animation, and interviews, P.S. weaves together the stories of a scholar of deconstruction, Theo Marks, a film director, Joanna, and the events of Derrida’s text “Envois.” Theo is struggling to come to terms with the dramatic events of his own life, which becomes indistinguishable from the story of The Post Card, while Joanna’s story documents the struggle to put philosophy into film. The film also features an unseen interview with Derrida himself from the original filming of Ken McMullen’s Ghost Dance.  Prof. McQuillan will conduct a Q&A after the screening.  The reception, screening and Q&A are all FREE.

The Martha Redbone Roots Project will bring 2 days of events to UALR on April 3-4, 2014.  The Martha Redbone Roots Project trio will present a 75 minute performance, followed by a Q&A starting at 2:00pm on Thursday April 3.  This show is limited to UALR English students and others.  On Friday, April 4, Redbone with visit with several UALR classes, and on Friday evening, April 4, her Roots Project Trio will present a full 2-hour concert, FREE and OPEN TO THE PUBLIC.  Both musical performances will be at Stella Boyle Smith Auditorium.  You can check out her music at Martha’s YouTube channel here.  Let me just say that Martha Redbone’s setting of William Blake’s poetry to Appalachian folk arrangements is not to be missed.  Here is more info from the publicity release: The “charismatic indie-soul diva” (Time Out New York), Martha Redbone, is an Independent Music Award-winning musician of Cherokee, Choctaw, Shawnee and African-American descent. Since bursting onto the scene at the 2002 Native American Music Awards, she has established a solid history of performing, educating, and mentoring across Native North America and in some cases abroad.

Martha’s new album The Garden of Love – Songs of William Blake (2012), produced by Nitty Gritty Dirt Band Founder and multiple Grammy Award Winner John McEuen — is an unexpected twist to the Appalachian music of Martha’s childhood years with her grandparents in Black Mountain, Kentucky. It is a brilliant fusion of Martha’s magnificent voice, Blake’s immortal words and a cornucopia of roots music (folk, country, piedmont blues, gospel, honkytonk, bluegrass, soul and traditional Native). Redbone is a mesmerizing and dynamic live performer thrilling audiences and critics alike, with rave reviews from with rave reviews from All Music Guide to The New Yorker to Sing Out! She is also now building a national radio presence including recent features on NPR’s All Things Considered with Robert Siegel, WNYC’s Soundcheck and New Sounds, hosted by John Schaefer, and Sirius Satellite (Mary Sue Twohy’s and Bob Edwards’ shows).

Currently, she leads and tours with Martha Redbone Roots Project, a band ranging from trio to septet. Her shows include performances from the acclaimed new album as well as a unique gumbo of roots, blues, soul and funk. Recent stage highlights include numerous World and Traditional Music Festivals from California WorldFest, to Vancouver Folk Festival, and four years at New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival. She’s become respected from concert halls like City Winery (NYC and Chicago), to prominent Tribal PowWows and Native American events like Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian’s Inaugural Ball in 2013, and institutions like University of Iowa/Hancher Auditorium who host a week-long residency in September 2013.

UPCOMING COOPER SEMINAR

In Fall 2014, Prof. Kris McAbee will offer a Cooper seminar on “Revenge.”  Here’s what she says about it:  This course will interrogate the nature of revenge as a thematic device. We will ask, “What are the elements of revenge? What differentiates revenge from justice? What do we learn from revengers and their quests?” Beginning with Greek tragedies, we will then work through a survey of revenge-oriented texts from the sixteenth century to the present day, representing a range of genres including drama, broadsides ballads, opera, prose fiction, and film. Among selections developed by the class, texts will include: Euripides’s Medea, Seneca’s Thyestes, Kyd’s The Spanish Tragedy, Ford’s ‘Tis a Pity She’s a Whore, Mozart’s Don Giovanni, Dumas’s Count of Monte Cristo, and Park Chan-Wook’s 2003 film, Old Boy.  For more information contact Dr. McAbee at kxmcabee@ualr.edu.

SAVE THE DATES!

The annual Shakespeare Scene Festival will be held on Thursday and Friday, March 13 and 14, 2014.  It’s great to see local middle and high school students come to terms with the Bard.  For more information or to help out, contact Dr. Kris McAbee at kxmcabeel@ualr.edu.

The Cooper Colloquium and Picnic will be held on Friday, May 9, 2014.  Watch for details of time, place, and participants.  It looks like we’ll have an embarrassment of riches in interesting projects this year.  Plan now to come and celebrate our honors graduates.

STUDENT SUCCESS

Stephanie Mantell has been admitted to Bowen Law School, and named a William H. Bowen Scholar with a full scholarship for all three years of law school.  Congratulations, Stephanie!

Doc Yoder’s class on John Milton held a (half) marathon reading of Milton’s epic Paradise Lost on Sunday, Feb. 2.  The reading was called off after Book VI (about 7 hours) because of inclement weather, but Books VII-XII have been rescheduled.  I extracted students’ comments about the marathon from their weekly journals and posted them to the Milton listserve.  We got picked up by the “Milton Revealed” blog.  You can check us out here.  I’m really proud of the class for working together and pulling this off, and I’m very impressed with the insights you reached after just reading the poem aloud once.  Great work!  And wait till you see the second half.

As always, if you see any errors or problems or with the Broadsheet, or news to add, please contact Doc Yoder at rpyoder@ualr.edu.

Cooper Broadsheet: October 2013

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REGISTRATION FOR SPRING 2014

Registration for Spring 2014 begins on November 18.  Cooper students should be advised by Dr. Yoder, the Program Director, or by their project mentors.  Students planning to graduate in May 2014 should check with Dr. Philpotts to insure that all their requirements have been met.  Secondary Education minors should be advised by Dr. Minnick.  For all other English majors, the point person for advising is Dr. Barrio-Vilar.  Please do not wait until the last minute to get advised.

SPRING 2014 COOPER SEMINAR

Dr. Angela Hunter will offer a seminar called Going Postal: Letters, Literature, and Beyond.  Some of our oldest literature is in the form of letters (real or fictional), and today many works still use letters as important aspects of a work.  But what constitutes a letter?  Are emails and postcards letters? What is the place of letters in literature or of literature in letters?  Do we read “fictional” letters differently from “real” letters? How do letters question our understanding of what it means to read, and specifically to read literature? These questions will guide our examination of the relationship between letter-writing, letter-reading, and literature.  We will discover that letters ask us to think not only about writers and readers, but also about the various systems that transmit and circulate messages and letters (postal, electronic, etc.)

COOPER LECTURE SERIES 

On October 1, the Cooper Program co-hosted with Gender Studies a lecture by Dr. Lisa Corrigan on the convergence of racist rhetoric and sexual anxiety during the 1957 Central High integration crisis.  Those in attendance were treated to a stirring presentation and call to action to get involved with improving race, class and gender relations at the local, state and national levels.

October 24: In conjunction with Dr. Jeremy Ecke’s Cooper seminar on epic, Dr. Kristin Hanson of the University of California at Berkeley will present her lecture, “’London Homesick Blues’:  English Poetic Forms in West Texas Songs.”  The lecture will be at 6:30pm in DSC-G, with a reception before the lecture at 6:00pm.  Reception and lecture are FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC.  Dr. Hanson specializes in poetic meter and linguistic approaches to literature. She received her PhD in Linguistics from Stanford University in 1990 and taught at the University of British Columbia from 1990-1996. Developing the theory of generative metrics, Professor Hanson has co-authored a number of seminal articles in metrical theory with the Stanford linguist Paul Kiparsky. Professor Hanson is currently working on a monograph entitled “An art that nature makes”: a linguistic perspective on meter in English; her teaching and writing ranges from the poetics of Shakespeare, Donne, Tennyson, and Hopkins to the relation between ballroom dancing and metrical feet.  Professor Hanson’s Cooper lecture, drawn from her current UC Berkeley course “Hardly Strictly Lyric Poems,” will explore the cultural, formal, and poetic relationship between Renaissance lyrics and the music of the West Texan folk/country/roots group The Flatlanders.  You can learn more about Dr. Hanson and her work here.

November 7: In conjunction with Prof. Nickole Brown’s Cooper seminar, poet and novelist Victoria Redel will read from her work.  The reading will held in Ross Hall 123, and it will begin at 6:15pm, with a reception before the reading at 5:45pm.  Prof. Redel is on the faculty at Sarah Lawrence College.  She is the author of 3 books of poetry (including Woman Without Umbrella (2012)), 2 novels (including The Border of Truth (2007) and Loverboy (2001) which was made into the 2005 movie starring Kyra Sedgwick and directed by Kevin Bacon), and 2 collections of short stories.  You can check out her webpage here.  The reception and reading are FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC.

STUDY ABROAD

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In June 2013, Dr. Kris McAbee led a study-abroad course on “Shakespeare’s England.” Eight students traveled to England to study Shakespeare in the context of his homeland. Highlights of the trip included the Tower of London, a day-trip to Hampton Court (the palatial home to Henry VIII), and a weekend in Shakespeare’s birthplace, Stratford-upon-Avon. The class toured the theaters of the Royal Shakespeare Company, where they saw productions of Titus Andronicus and Hamlet. Back in London, the class visited the reconstructed Globe, where they participated in a guided tour and attended a production of The Tempest.

As always, if you see mistakes in this Broadsheet or if you have any questions, please contact Dr. Paul Yoder at rpyoder@ualr.edu.

Cooper Broadsheet: September 2013

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WELCOME BACK!

The Cooper Honors Program and the English Department welcome everyone back for the 2013-2014 academic year.  We hope you had a great summer.  We have lots of news, so let’s get to it.

STIPEND RECIPIENTS FOR 2013-2014

We all want to congratulate this year’s Cooper stipend recipients.  Cooper stipends are $1300 per semester for up to 4 semesters.  The deadline for applications for next year’s stipends will be Consultation Day of the Spring 2014 semester.

Second year recipients:  Delilah DeVary Ashcraft, Caitlin Love, Lucas Rudd, Breana Steele and Joanna Waldron.

First year recipients: Olivia Barry, Spencer Campbell, Logan Ellis, Heather Haile, Hunter Parham, Matt Quin, Zachary Roberson, Brandi Schroeder, Callie Smith, Gina Vanegas, Ali Webb and Nikki Wilkinson.

NEW FACULTY

The English Department is pleased to welcome Dr. Paul A. Crutcher to the faculty.  Dr. Crutcher recently earned his doctorate in Curriculum, Teaching, and Educational Policy from Michigan State University, adding that to his credentials in Philosophy, English, Women’s and Gender Studies, and Writing. He served in the Peace Corps (China ’05-’07), and spent years living in and studying East Asia. His experiences have shaped his research and teaching interests, which include pop culture, social education, language and literacy, and empathy.  You can find out more about Dr. Crutcher here.

GRE AND GRADUATE SCHOOL PREPARATION SESSIONS

Thinking about graduate school?  When do you apply?  What do you need to do?  How do you decide?  The Cooper Honors Program is once again sponsoring a series of preparation sessions for those of you thinking about graduate school.    All sessions are on Fridays, and will meet in Stabler Hall 401 at 2:00pm.  Here is the schedule:

Sept. 6: GRE Preparation, conducted by recent English graduate Stephanie Mantell.

Sept. 13: What you need to know about applying for Graduate School in Literature, conducted by Dr. Kris McAbee, Dr. Jeremy Ecke, Dr.Trey Philpotts, and Doc Yoder.

Sept. 27: What you need to know about applying for Graduate School in Creative Writing, conducted by Prof. Nickole Brown and Dr. Dave Jauss.

COOPER HONORS SEMINARS

Fall 2013

Dr. Jeremy Ecke is teaching a seminar on the Epic Tradition, focusing on Gilgamesh, Beowulf, The Cid, and The Nibelungenlied.

Professor Nickole Brown is teaching a seminar on Writing Between Borders, focusing on prose poetry, novels-in-verse, and hybrid work.

Spring 2014

Dr. Angela Hunter will offer a seminar called Going Postal: Letters, Literature, and Beyond.  Some of our oldest literature is in the form of letters (real or fictional), and today many works still use letters as important aspects of a work.  But what constitutes a letter?  Are emails and postcards letters? What is the place of letters in literature or of literature in letters?  Do we read “fictional” letters differently from “real” letters? How do letters question our understanding of what it means to read, and specifically to read literature? These questions will guide our examination of the relationship between letter-writing, letter-reading, and literature.  We will discover that letters ask us to think not only about writers and readers, but also about the various systems that transmit and circulate messages and letters (postal, electronic, etc.)

COOPER SPEAKER SERIES

We have an exciting program of speakers lined up for the coming year.  The titles for the talks and venues are still TBA, but save the dates!

Oct. 1: Dr. Lisa Corrigan: Co-sponsored by the Cooper Honors Program and the Gender Studies Program, in conjunction with Dr. Laura Barrio-Vilar’s Women in Literature class.  Her lecture will be entitled “Orval Faubus and the Language of Segregation: Homonationalism, Sexualized Violence, and Racial Anxiety During the Little Rock Crisis.”  Dr. Corrigan is an Assistant Professor of Communication, Co-Chair of the Gender Studies Program, and Affiliate Faculty in both African & African American Studies and Latin American Studies in the Fulbright College of Arts and Sciences at the University of Arkansas at Fayetteville. She has published articles in a variety of journals, and her book, tentatively titled Prison Power: How Prison Politics Influenced the Movement for Black Liberation, is under contract with the University of Alabama Press in its “Rhetoric, Culture and Social Critique” series.  Learn more about her here.

Oct. 24: Dr. Kristin Hanson in conjunction with Dr. Jeremy Ecke’s Cooper seminar on the epic tradition.  Dr. Hanson is Associate Professor at the University of California at Berkeley, specializing in poetry and linguistics, especially meter and Medieval and Early Modern literature.  She is author of numerous articles.  You can learn more about her work here.

Nov. 7:  Victoria Redel in conjunction with Prof. Nickole Brown’s Cooper seminar.  Prof. Redel is on the faculty at Sara Lawrence College.  She is the author of 3 books of poetry, 3 novels, and a forthcoming collection of short stories.  Check out her webpage here.

February (exact date TBA): Martin McQuillan in conjunction with Dr. Angela Hunter’s Cooper seminar.  Dr. McQuillan is Professor and Dean of Arts and Social Sciences at Kingston University in London, England.  He is a literary theorist, author of numerous articles and director of a forthcoming film based on Jacques Derrida’s The Post Card from Socrates to Freud and Beyond, which we hope to show as part of his presentation.  You can learn more about him here.

STUDENT NEWS

Nikki Ackerman was chosen as a finalist for an internship with the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences based on her script for an episode of Castle.

Seth Pennington (May 2013 grad) JULY 30 read with a showcase of Sibling Rivalry Press (where he is Associate Editor) authors in Bryant Park in New York City on July 30 to a crowd of 140.  You can check out some pictures here.

Zachary Roberson participated in the 48 Hour Film project, August 16-18 along with 30 other film-making teams around Arkansas.  Their short film entitled “Castle Road” will screen at the Bank of America building on August 30th.

FACULTY NEWS

Dr. Dave Jauss:  Along with a variety of other publications this year, Dr. Jauss’s new book Glossolalia: New & Selected Stories will be published on Sept. 9 by Press 53.  On Sept. 10, there will be a launch party for the book at South on Main, The Oxford American magazine’s new restaurant/literary salon/music and art venue located at 1304 Main Street.  The party will begin at 6:00 p.m. and will include a brief reading and Q&A.  Prof. Nickole Brown will serve as emcee and the T4 Jazz Trio will perform.  Books will be available for purchase and signing.  Dinner and drinks will be available from the South on Main restaurant. If you’re unable to attend and would like to order a copy of the book, go to http://press53.com/BioDavidJauss.html.

Dr. Kris McAbee led a group of students on a Study Abroad trip to England, focusing on Shakespeare and research opportunities in and around London.  Look for pictures in the next Broadsheet.

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This month’s header image is from the carnivorous plants garden at Duke University Gardens.  Photo by Doc Yoder.

If you see any errors and or have any problems with the Cooper Broadsheet, please contact Doc Yoder at rpyoder@ualr.edu.

Cooper Broadsheet — April 2013

TIME TO APPLY FOR A COOPER STIPEND!

Cooper Honors students take small intense seminars on special topics.  They work one-on-one with a faculty mentor on a tutorial on a topic of the student’s choice.  They complete major writing projects on a topic of their choice that they can show to grad schools, future employers and anybody they care to brag to, showing that they have mad skills in research, reasoning, imagination, writing and organization.  And they receive a stipend of $1300 per semester for 4 semesters.  As usual, the deadline for applying to the Cooper Honors Program is Consultation Day of the spring semester; this year that day is May 7, 2013.  You can find information and application forms and guidelines at the Cooper webpage here.  For more information please contact the Program Director, Dr. Paul Yoder, at rpyoder@ualr.edu.

COOPER SPRING COLLOQUIUM

The Cooper Spring Colloquium and picnic will be held on May 10, 2013.  The colloquium will be at 11:30am-1:30pm in DSC-B.  Lunch will be provided.  The picnic will start around 5:30pm and will be at Pavilion #4 at Murray Park on Rebsamen Park Rd. on the Arkansas River.  Pavilion #4 is the one near the playground on the west end of the park.  The picnic this year will be catered by Homer’s.  Come and join family and friends to celebrate the achievements of our honors students, who this year include

Kassie Adkins, “Three Things Are Better: The Voyages of Sinbad the Sailor.”  Mentor: Dr. Paul Yoder

Stephen Burns, “How Big Brother Unteaches Freedom: Noncritical Pedagogy as a Means of Oppression in George Orwell’s Nineteen Eighty-Four.”  Mentor: Dr. Earl Ramsey

Tamra Creed, “Writing Therapy: A Collection of Poems.”  Mentor: Dr. Dave Jauss

Seth Pennington, “The Pull” (A Chapbook).  Mentor:  Prof. Nickole Brown

COOPER SEMINARS FOR FALL 2013

I am pleased to announce that for the first time in quite a few years, in Fall 2013 the Cooper Program will offer two seminars.  Cooper seminars are designed to be small and eye-opening; with two seminars being offered each semester, Cooper honors students as well as other advanced students will have more opportunity and choices for these classes.  The two seminars in the fall will be conducted by two of the English department’s most recent additions, and together the classes reach from the most ancient traditions to the most recent innovations.

Dr. Jeremy Ecke will offer “The Epic Tradition.”  From the Babylonian struggles of the demigod Gilgamesh, to the dragon slaying exploits of Beowulf, the bloody and tragic revenge of Siegfried, and the embattled heroism of the Castilian “lord-master of war” Cid el Campeador, this course will study the heroic, mythic, and generic motifs that unite and distinguish a broad range of ancient and medieval epics.  We will supplement our reading of the primary texts with literary, cinematic, and operatic adaptions to further explore how our conception of the hero and the epic have been shaped by modern aesthetics, politics, and editorial practice.  In addition to lively discussion, the class will include a comparative essay, a reading journal, and a translation project in which you will adapt a scene or passage from one of the works into contemporary English or an artistic mode of your choice (song, painting, dance, collage, etc.).

Professor Nickole Brown will offer “Writing Between Borders.”  The uncharted space between the genres of prose and poetry is the focus of this course that will study experiments in literature — prose, poetry, novels-in-verse, and hybrid work — for a deeper understanding of what’s possible.  Both a seminar for students of literature and of creative writing their own cross-genre work.

COOPER SPEAKER SERIES

The final Cooper speaker of the 2012-2013 school year will be poet Rebecca Gayle Howell.  Howell’s reading will be on Wednesday, May 1 in DSC-G at 6:00pm, with a reception at 5:30.  Howell has published poems and translations in Ecotone, Hayden’s Ferry Review, Indiana Review, Ninth Letter, Poetry Daily, and storySouth.  Her awards include a poetry fellowship from the Fine Arts Work Center and a Jules Chametzky Prize in Literary Translation.  Library Journal chose Howell’s translation of Amal al-Jabouri’s Hagar Before the Occupation/Hagar After the Occupation (Alice James Books) as a 2011 best book of poetry.  Hagar was also a finalist for the Best Translated Book Award (BTBA).  Howell’s Collection Render/An Apocalypse was selected by Nick Flynn for the 2012 Cleveland State University Poetry Center’s First Book Prize.  You can check out her webpage here.  As always, this Cooper Speaker event is FREE and OPEN TO THE PUBLIC.

The lecture by Dr.Charles Rzepka, Professor of English at Boston University, on April 4, 2013 went very well.  Roughly 60 people came out on a rainy evening for Rzepka’s lecture, “The Emergence of the Ethnic American Detective.”

The poetry reading by Frank X. Walker who was in town for the Arkansas Literary Festival was also very successful, drawing over 50 people to his noon-time reading, hosted by Prof. Nickole Brown.

As always, if you have news to report, or you see any errors or problems with this webpage, please contact Doc Yoder at rpyoder@ualr.edu.